Connecting countries to climate technology solutions
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Eldis

Eldis is an online information service providing free access to relevant, up-to-date and diverse research on international development issues. The database includes over 40,000 summaries and provides free links to full-text research and policy documents from over 8,000 publishers. Each document is selected by members of our editorial team. Eldis is hosted by IDS but our service is delivered by a growing global network of organisations including IID in Bangladesh, CSDMS in India, Soul Beat Africa, and the National Library Service in Malawi.
These partners help to ensure that Eldis can present a truly global picture of development research. We make a special effort to cover high quality research from smaller research producers, especially those from developing countries, alongside that of the larger, northern based, research organisations.

Eldis

  • Exploring the 'Gender ICT Climate Change' Nexus in Development: From Digital Divide to Digital Empowerment

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    The issue of how gender influences the effectiveness of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) in tackling climate change is under-researched. This paper offers a systematic review of how gender shapes, and is shaped by, the interaction of ICTs and climate change. It explains why, and how, women tend to be more constrained than men from using ICTs in tackling climate change. Women are systematically disadvantaged in terms of control over and access to assets, institutions and structures, which effects how they adapt to climate change and respond to climate-related disasters.

  • GM crops: biotech agriculture: time to take GM seriously

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    Biotechnology companies assert that genetically modified crops enable better pest control, reduced spraying, safety for non-target species, higher stress tolerance and more consistent yields. In short, the industry believes that green biotechnologies provide a secure and sustainable food and energy solution. This article examines the industry's claims and argues that the evidence to support them is mixed. Themes discussed include:

  • Food and energy sovereignty now: Brazilian grassroots position on agroenergy

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    Brazil is the global leader in ethanol exports, providing 70% of the world's supply in 2006. While official accounts of the Brazilian government’s experiment with biofuels laud it as a global model for sustainable biomass production, it is increasingly being criticised and opposed by national social movements.

  • GM and climate change: a hungry world needs answers on GM crops

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     Climate change will cause a net drop in food production. This editorial argues that genetically modified (GM) crops have an important role to play in addressing the impending climate-related food crisis. The author asserts that GM crops can help to tackle the emerging food crisis in three ways:

  • China's energy conditions and policies

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    China is now the world's second-largest energy producer and consumer and plays an increasingly important role in maintaining global energy security. This government White Paper sets out China's policy to develop a modern energy industry that takes both resource conservation and environmental protection into consideration.
    The paper covers:

  • Effect of meteorological factors on clinical malaria risk among children: an assessment using village-based meteorological stations and community-based parasitological survey

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    This paper, published in BMC public health, examines the effects of meteorological factors (temperature, relative humidity and rainfall) on the incidence of clinical malaria. It uses data collected from over 670 children in urban and rural areas of Burkina Faso. The paper finds that all of the meteorological factors investigated affect the incidence of malaria among children under five, and that mean temperature alone is the strongest predictor of clinical malaria. The relationship with clinical malaria is bell-shaped such that the risk was lowest at low and high temperatures.

  • Using climate to predict infectious diseases epidemics

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    This World Health Organization document evaluates the potential of climate-based disease early warning as a means of improving preparedness for, and response to, epidemics. The authors develop a conceptual framework for constructing and evaluating a climate-based early warning system (EWS). The report highlights that many of the most important infectious diseases, and particularly those transmitted by insects, are highly sensitive to climate variations. However, the published literature includes no full descriptions of climate-based EWS being used to influence disease control decisions.

  • Can crops be climate-proofed?

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    Among the most worrying aspects of climate change is its effects on the world's food supply. This article explores the urgent need to put climate change at the heart of agricultural research programmes to ensure the adaptation of major crops to a changing climate.
    The author argues that, while the previous focus of crop scientists was on the improvement of yields, with successive International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports warning that increased flooding and drought will shift crop systems, “climate-proofing” of crops has become crucial. Key findings include:

  • Biofuels, climate change and GM crops: who is really benefiting?

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    Biofuels are attracting increased attention and investment as an alternative to fossil-based fuels and a means of combating climate change, yet there are many critics. This one-page briefing explores some of the concerns surrounding biofuels and the limitations posed by large-scale biofuel production.
    Key points highlighted include the following:

  • Climate prediction of El Nino malaria epidemics in north-west Tanzania

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    This paper, published in the Malaria Journal examines the relationship between climate and malaria incidence in Kagera in northwest Tanzania, with the aim of determining whether seasonal weather forecasts may assist in predicting malaria epidemics. The study uses malaria and climatic data collected during two annual malaria seasons over a period of ten years from 1990. It finds that malaria incidence is positively correlated with rainfall during the first season (October-March).